Creating tweets


You can draft a tweet on your own or you can share (or modify and share) another user's tweet.
(You can also use sharing buttons from other websites to post on Twitter but this is not recommended for privacy reasons)


Contents

What a Tweet Looks Like
Interacting with Others
Sharing Others' Tweets: Retweeting & Modifying Tweets
Adding Hashtags to a Tweet


What a Tweet Looks Like


The Anatomy of a Tweet

Ryan Deeds put together the graphic below to illustrate the parts of a tweet.
Click here for more detail about each of these parts of a tweet and other information
about tweeting that is discussed on this page.
external image anatomyofatweet.jpeg?w=600&h=337

A Simple Tweet

This user has typed out a message and included a hashtag.



Interacting with Others

A Reply to the Above Tweet

By pressing on 'Reply' underneath the original tweet, one user can reply to another. Only those who follow either the original author or the user who replied
can see the response in their feed.


Sharing Others' Tweets: Retweeting & Modifying Tweets

To Retweet a post without modifying it at all is as simple as clicking the Retweet button located

along the bottom of the tweet.


Retweeting with Manual Modifications

A manual retweet (RT) from an article tweeted from another source.

Retweeting this way can be used to add further insight into the tweet or the information contained
in the link without modifying the original message.


Before
After
For a retweet, you can copy and paste the message from and then type 'RT' before the person's name or you can add a
'Classic RT' browser extension.

Modified tweet (MT) from a tweet altered from its original state

Retweeting this way can be used to add further insight into the tweet or the information contained
in the link, but the MT denotes that the original message has been altered from its original format.
This is often done because the total tweet exceeds 140 characters.


Before
After


Adding Hashtags to a Tweet

A hashtag begins with a '#' and can be used to categorize information in a searchable way. It can also be used
to denote humour, irony or other commentary. Conferences, topics and even weekly chats among professionals
are organized in hashtags. Search the hashtag on Google if you want to know how it's being used. You may even
find others on that tag to follow. A list of educational hashtags can be found here.


Hashtags being used for categorizing
A hashtag used for humour/commentary


Next: Touring the Twitter homepage